4 Pennsylvania Plaza, New York, NY 10001

 


    Madison Square Garden is an indoor arena venue just south of the theatre district in Manhattan above Pennsylvania Station. Often referred to as “The Garden” or as “MSG,” it is used to host professional sporting events such as boxing, hockey, and basketball, as well as for circuses, ice shows, and many other forms of entertainment. There have been several other venues with the same name since the 1870s. This is the fourth incarnation of Madison Square Garden. It was opened in 1968. Seating capacity varies between events, but is generally around 20,000.

    Beneath the main arena, there is a second event space called The Theater at Madison Square Garden. It seats from 2000 up to about 5,600 people, making it larger than any of the Broadway Theatre venues, though with a much lower ceiling.


     

    1260 6th Ave
    New York, NY 10020

     

      Radio City Music Hall  is a New York landmark.  It is the home to the Rockettes, and serves as host to some of New York City’s most prominent concerts. It’s nickname is the Showplace of the Nation. Radio City Music Hall was designed by Edward Durell Stone and Donald Deskey. When it first opened in 1932, its largest auditorium was the largest in the world. At 5,960 seats, it remains an enormous and amazing event venue.   It is much larger than the largest Broadway Theatre, the Gershwin, which has comparatively only 1,933 seats.

       

      1634 Broadway
      New York, NY 10019

      • Beetlejuice

        The ghost-with-the-most makes his Broadway debut in this hilarious new musical based on Tim Burton’s dearly beloved film. The story of a strange and unusual teenager who feels invisible and a spirited demon who is invisible, Beetlejuice is an “EYE-POPPING EXPERIENCE WITH WICKEDLY GOOD TUNES, OFF-THE-WALL HUMOR, AND ENDLESS VISUAL DELIGHTS!” (Variety). And under its uproarious surface (six feet under, to be exact), it’s a remarkably touching show about family, love, and making the most of every Day-O!

      The Winter Garden was built on and in the second American Horse Exchange. The Exchange had been constructed in 1896 when Longacre Square (now Times Square) was the center of the horse and carriage trade.  The Shuberts rented out the Exchange in 1911 and transformed it into the Winter Garden Theatre.  Architect William Albert Swasey converted the show ring into an auditorium with only one balcony and decorated it with a garden theme.  The existing space determined that Swasey would have to design an abnormally wide theatre and therefore, the audience would be closer to the stage.  At one point, there was a water tank on stage, and in its first ten years a runway extended into the audience.  The audience referred to it as “The Bridge of Thighs” due to the number of leggy showgirls who appeared on it. Twelve years after it opened, Herbert J.  Krapp renovated the interior and he removed the runway, lowered the ceiling and proscenium arch, and redecorated the theatre in a more Adamesque style.  The Winter Garden has housed mainly revues and musicals, and almost every Al Jolson musical was produced on its stage.  After Cats closed in 2001, architect Francesca Russo supervised a multimillion dollar renovation of the theatre that transformed it back to its Twenties’ style.

      In 2001, architect Francesca Russo supervised a multimillion dollar renovation of the Winter Garden, transforming it back to its garden-themed style of the Twenties.

      The Winter Garden, which inhabits the second American Horse Exhange, was converted into a theatre by architect William Albert Swasey in 1911.

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      245 West 52nd Street
      New York, NY 10036

      • Mean Girls

        Mean Girls is the musical adaptation of Tina Fey’s hit movie of the same name. Friendships and power-dynamics are all at play here, accompanied by a healthy dose of humor and wit.

      The August Wilson Theatre was designed by architects C. Howard Crane and Kenneth Franzheim and constructed by the Theatre Guild.  In 1925, it opened as the Guild Theatre with a revival of Caesar and Cleopatra by George Bernard Shaw.  The venue was rented out to WOR-Mutual Radio as a studio in 1943.  In 1950, the American National Theater and Academy purchased it and renamed it the ANTA Theatre.  Jujamcyn Theaters purchased it in 1981 and named it the Virginia Theatre to honor the owner and Jujamcyn Board member, Virginia McKnight Binger.  James H. Binger died in 2004, and producer and president of Jujamcyn, Rocco Landesman, stated that he planned to purchase Jujamcyn.  Two weeks after August Wilson’s death, the theatre was renamed in his honor on October 16, 2005.

      The August Wilson Theatre
       

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      254 West 54th Street
      New York, NY 10019

      • Caroline, or Change

        Tony Award-nominated and Olivier Award-winning musical Caroline, or Change is coming to Broadway. Starring 2019 Olivier Award-winner Sharon D Clarke reprising her role as “Caroline” from the acclaimed West End production.

      Studio 54

      Studio 54 originally opened as the Gallo Opera House in 1927 with a production of La Boheme.  Impresario Fortune Gallo struggled financially with the opera and eventually began producing nonmusical productions such as Electra, starring Antoinette Perry.  After constant failures, the venue was sold in foreclosure after the stock market crash in 1929.  It changed names and management numerous times until 1943 when it finally began housing CBS radio and television broadcasts such as “The Johnny Carson Show” and “Captain Kangaroo.”  It was then renamed Studio 52.  The soap opera, Love of Life, was produced there until 1975. The space was sold to Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager, who converted the venue into the famous nightclub Studio 54 in the late 1970s.  In 1986, the club closed and was essentially neglected until the Roundabout discovered the venue in 1998.  Their Tony award-winning production of Cabaret transferred to the venue after it ran for nine months at the Stephen Sondheim Theatre.  In 2003, the Roundabout purchased Studio 54.  The first show under the Roundabout’s management was Stephen Sondheim’s Tony award-winning Assassins.

       

      125 West 43rd Street
      New York, NY 10036

      • Mrs. Doubtfire

        Helloooooooo, poppets! Mrs. Doubtfire is a musical now, dearie! Based upon the beloved 1993 Twentieth Century Fox Motion Picture.

      The Stephen Sondheim Theatre was originally named after actor-producer Henry Miller. Architects Paul R. Allen and Ingalls & Hoffman designed the Stephen Sondheim Theatre in the Neo-classical style.  It was constructed by and originally named for actor-producer Henry Miller.  On April 1, 1918, it opened with a production of The Fountain of Youth.  It was the first theatre in Manhattan that had air-conditioning.  From the 1930s to the late 1960s, the theatre housed a range of famous performers, including Leslie Howard, Douglas Fairbanks, Helen Hayes, Lillian Gish, and Ruth Chatterton.  It began showing feature films in 1968 until the 1970s when it became a porn theater called Avon-at-the-Hudson.  It was transformed into the disco nightclub Xenon in 1978.

      The venue then opened as SHOUT, a 1950s/1960s nightclub, on August 31, 1985, which lasted for six years.   The Roundabout restored, reopened and managed the Henry Miller Theatre in 1998 for their Tony award-winning production of Cabaret. 

      Nine months later, however, the venue was forced to close because of a construction accident at a neighboring building.  The Henry Miller Theatre reopened as the first LEED-certified Broadway house in 2009 and raised the bar for environmentally maintainable design and structure of performing arts venues.  It was renamed the Stephen Sondheim in 2010 to honor the composer and lyricist’s 80th birthday.

      To honor the composer/lyricist’s 80th birthday, the Henry Miller’s Theatre was renamed the Stephen Sondheim in 2010.

       

      250 West 52nd Street
      New York, NY 10019

      • MJ The Musical

        MJ The Musical is a non-stop grooving brand new musical about the life of Michael Jackson, featuring some of his greatest hits! Coming to Broadway Summer 2020

      The Neil Simon has housed the hit musical Hairspray.The Neil Simon Theatre opened as the Alvin in 1927.  On June 29, 1983, it was renamed in honor of Neil Simon following the successful production of Brighton Beach Memoirs (with Matthew Broderick), which was the first play in an autobiographical trilogy about Simon’s family and youth.  The second play of his trilogy, Biloxi Blues (also with Matthew Broderick), played there successfully in 1985.  Jake’s Women, another one of Simon’s plays with Alan Alda, was housed there in 1992.  The Neil Simon has housed two of Broadway’s most famous productions since 2000: The Music Man revival and the Tony Award-winning Hairspray.  The Neil Simon is one of the Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.  Other recent productions include Swan Lake; The King and I; Rise and Fall of Little Voice; Jackie Mason: Brand New; Breaking the Code with Derek Jacobi; and the Stephen Sondheim/George Furth musical Merrily We Roll Along.

      The Neil Simon has housed the hit musical Hairspray.

       

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      In 1927, the Neil Simon Theatre opened as the Alvin and was renamed in honor of Neil Simon on June 29, 1983.
      In 1927, the Neil Simon Theatre opened as the Alvin and was renamed in honor of Neil Simon on June 29, 1983.

      225 West 44th Street
      New York, NY 10036

       
       
       

      • To Kill A Mockingbird

        To Kill A Mockingbird, the novel written by Harper Lee, is coming to Broadway, as an adaptation by Aaron Sorkin. The story of To Kill A Mockingbird follows Atticus Finch, a lawyer in a small town in 1930’s Alabama, whose kids Scout and Jem are hugely affected by Atticus’ decision to defend a black man accused of rape.    

      The Shubert Theatre opened in 1913 with British actor Johnston Forbes-Robertson’s repertory company.
      The Shubert Theatre opened in 1913 with British actor Johnston Forbes-Robertson’s repertory company.

      The Shubert Theatre had its origin in The New Theatre and was located on Central Park West. It was dedicated to serious repertory drama.  Despite the fact that it was a failure, the New Group (which included Lee Shubert) rented out land between 44th and 45th Streets to build a new theatre.  The plan was neglected for some time, but eventually Lee Shubert and his former New Theatre partner, Winthrop Ames, obtained a lease for the site, and constructed two contiguous theatres there.  Shubert managed the larger house and named it the Sam S. Shubert Memorial Theatre in honor of his brother who had died in May 1905.  Ames operated the smaller house.

      The Shubert was originally located on Central Park West and was dedicated to serious repertory drama.
      The Shubert was originally located on Central Park West and was dedicated to serious repertory drama.

      The famous British actor Johnston Forbes-Robertson opened the theatre with his repertory company in 1913, staging productions of Hamlet, The Merchant of Venice, Othello, and other plays.  Designed by architect Henry Herts, the exterior of the Shubert is in the style of the “Venetian Renaissance”.  To conform to a law in the city’s building code stating that no part of the structure could protrude past the building line, Herts decorated the exterior with graffito.  The Shubert’s interior is made up of ornate decoration and theatrically-themed painted panels that garnish the boxes, the area above the proscenium arch, and the ceiling.

      The Shubert Theatre

      236 West 45th Street
      New York, NY 10036

      • Come From Away

        Broadway’s Come From Away Tony Award® winner for every BEST DIRECTOR  This New York Times Critics’ Pick takes you into the heart of the remarkable true story of 7,000 stranded passengers and the small town in Newfoundland that welcomed them. Cultures clashed and nerves ran high, but uneasiness turned into trust, music soared into the night, and gratitude grew into enduring friendships.    

      The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre Seating Chart

      The Shuberts constructed the Gerald Schoenfeld (originally named the Plymouth) in 1917 along with the adjoining Broadhurst.  It was architect Herbert Krapp’s first independent design contract.  The venue was originally rented out to producer Arthur M. Hopkins.  It opened with a production of Sweet Calamity followed by three Ibsen plays:  The Wild Duck (1918), Hedda Gabler (1918), and A Doll’s House (1918).

      The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre

      Hopkins produced What Price Glory? in 1924, noteworthy for its unflinchingly realistic representation of soldiers at war.  Other successful productions include Rachel Crother’s Susan and God (starring Gertrude Lawrence), Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning The Skin of Our Teeth (with Tallulah Bankhead), The Happy Time (starring Eva Gabor), The Odd Couple (with Art Carney and Walter Matthau), Peter Schaffer’s Equus (starring Anthony Hopkins), Wendy Wasserstein’s Pulitzer Prize-winning The Heidi Chronicles (with Joan Allen), and Frank Wildhorn’s Jekyll and Hyde.  In 2005, it was renamed the Gerald Schoenfeld in honor of the former chairman of the Shubert Organization.  The interior design themes and the Adamesque decorating faintly replicate the Booth’s and Shubert’s slightly more elaborate themes.

      schoenH1


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      The St. James Theatre stands on the site of the original Sardi’s restaurant.

      246 West 44th Street
      New York, NY 10036

      • Frozen

        Frozen, the Academy Award winning film from Disney is coming to Broadway in the spring of 2018. The hit musical tells the story of Anna and Elsa, two sisters and princesses. Once Elsa’s magical powers are unleashed, their life will never be the same. Frozen on Broadway will feature songs known from the popular film as well as new songs never heard before.  

      Abraham L. Erlanger, theatrical producer and founding member of the Theatrical Syndicate, constructed the St. James Theatre.  It stands on the location of the original Sardi’s restaurant. In 1927, it opened as the Erlanger Theatre with a production of Merry Malones.  In 1930, Erlanger died and the theatre was taken over by the Astor family as they owned the land on which the theatre was built.  They renamed it the St. James.  In the 1930s, the Shuberts purchased the theatre.  In 1957, they involuntarily sold it to William L.  McKnight after they lost an antitrust case.  In 1958, McKnight renovated and reopened the venue.  In 1970, McKnight passed the theatre on to his daughter Virginia and her husband James H. Binger, who had founded the Jujamcyn Theaters.

      Theatrical producer Abraham L. Erlanger, one of the founders of the Theatrical Syndicate, constructed the St. James and it opened in 1927 as the Erlanger.
      Theatrical producer Abraham L. Erlanger, one of the founders of the Theatrical Syndicate, constructed the St. James and it opened in 1927 as the Erlanger.
      The St. James Theatre stands on the site of the original Sardi’s restaurant.
      The St. James Theatre stands on the site of the original Sardi’s restaurant.

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      226 West 46th Street
      New York, NY 10036

      • Hamilton

        Hamilton, the new musical by the creator of In the Heights, Lin-Manuel Miranda is on Broadway after transferring from it’s sold out run at the Public Theatre. Hamilton tells the story of the beginnings of the United States through the life of Alexander Hamilton, the man who was our country’s first Treasury Secretary. It is the story of a bastard orphan who became George Washington’s right hand and who lived a life that was both unendingly interesting and dauntingly overwhelming.

      The Richard Rodgers Theatre Seating Chart

      In 1990, the theatre was renamed in honor of the composer, Richard Rodgers, who had an enormous impact on Broadway for more than 30 years.

      Originally named Chanin’s 46th Street Theatre, the venue was constructed by Irwin Chanin and opened in 1924.  The Shuberts bought the venue in 1931 and renamed it the 46th Street Theatre.  The Nederlander Organization purchased and renovated the theatre in 1982.  It was renamed in 1990 in honor of the composer Richard Rodgers whose shows successfully ran on Broadway for over 30 years.  Notable musicals this theatre has housed include Guys and Dolls, How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, Nine, Movin’ Out, Anything Goes, Damn Yankees, The Best Little Whorehouse In Texas, and Chicago.  In 2006, the theatre was renovated and it currently houses The Richard Rodgers Gallery.  The Richard Rodgers is one of the Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.  It currently holds the record as the venue that has housed the most Tony Award-winning Best Plays and Best Musicals.

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      1564 Broadway
      New York, NY 10036

       
       
       

        Sweet Charity was the first legitimate to be theatre production housed by the Palace in 1966.The Palace Theatre opened in 1913 and until the 1930s it was the most prestigious vaudeville theatre in the country.  This venue has housed numerous famous performers including Will Rogers, Ethel Merman, Judy Garland, Jerry Lewis, Bette Midler, and Diana Ross.  The Nederlanders converted it into a legitimate theatre in 1965 for the opening of the musical Sweet Charity by Neil Simon, Cy Coleman, and Dorothy Fields and starring Gwen Verdon.  In the 1970s, the Palace housed the musical hit Applause by Betty Comden and Adolph Green (with Lauren Bacall).  The musical successfully ran here for eighteen months.  Two successful productions of the 1980s were the Jerry Herman and Harvey Fierstein musical La Cage aux Folles (with George Hearn and Gene Barry) and the musical The Woman of the Year.  In 1994, the theatre housed Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, which was followed by their musical Aida.  The Palace Theatre is one of the Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.

        In 1913, the Palace Theatre opened and remained the most prestigious vaudeville theatre in the country until the 1930s, housing numerous renowned performers.

        230 West 49th Street
        New York, NY 10019


          The Eugene O’ Neill Theatre Seating ChartThe Eugene O’ Neill was built as part of a three-hotel complex named in honor of the 19th century tragedian Edwin Forrest.The Eugene O’ Neill Theatre opened on November 24, 1925, with the musical Mayflowers.  It was designed by Herbert J. Krapp and built for the Shuberts as part of a three-hotel complex named in honor of the 19th century tragedian Edwin Forrest.  In 1945, the theatre was renamed the Coronet and refurbished by architects Walker & Gillette.  In 1959, it was renamed the O’Neill by owner Lester Osterman in honor of the American playwright.  Neil Simon eventually purchased the theatre and sold it to Jujamcyn Theatres in 1982.  Notable productions that this venue has housed include Tobacco Road(1934), The Children’s Hour(1952), She Loves Me(1963), The Odd Couple(1966), Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead(1968), The Good Doctor(1973), I Ought To Be In Pictures(1980), Annie(1981), The Best Little Whorehouse In Texas(1982), Big River(1985), Grease(1994), and Death of a Salesman(1999).

          The Eugene O’ Neill was designed by Herbert J. Krapp and opened on November 24, 1925, with the musical Mayflowers.

           

           

           

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          214 West 42nd Street
          New York, NY 10036

          • Aladdin

            Disney’s animated film Aladdin (1992) is now a new musical. The magic of Aladdin, including the wonderful music by Alan Menken, which was written for the movie, takes the Broadway stage at the New Amsterdam Theatre. The book by Chad Beguelin (Elf, The Wedding Singer) is filled with adventure, action, romance, and humor. Aladdin offers families fantastic Broadway entertainment on every level.

          The New Amsterdam TheatreThe New Amsterdam Theatre was built in 1903 by A.L. Erlanger and Marcus Claw.  Architects Herts and Tallant designed the venue in the Art Nouveau style.  It is the oldest surviving Broadway theatre along with the Lyceum Theatre.  The theatre opened in November 1903 with Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.  It housed the Ziegfeld Follies for many years and its sister show, The Midnight Frolics, played in the venue’s roof garden theatre.  In 1936 after the Great Depression, the theatre closed.  In 1937, it reopened on a limited basis, but eventually it was altered to become a movie theatre.  In 1982, the Nederlander Organization bought the venue, but they would not begin restoration for another eight years.  In 1990, the State and City of New York took up ownership of the New Amsterdam and many other theatres on 42nd Street.  In 1993, Disney Theatrical Productions signed a 99 year lease for the venue.  The theatre was in total disrepair and it would take a million dollars and a few years to restore it.  The roof garden did not reopen because it could not be brought up to modern building codes.  On April 2, 1997, the New Amsterdam officially reopened.

           

          The New Amsterdam Theatre, constructed in 1903 by A.L. Erlanger and Marcus Claw, is the oldest surviving Broadway theatre along with the Lyceum Theatre.

          Disney Theatrical Productions signed a 99 year lease and began restoring the theatre in 1993, and the theatre officially reopened on April 2, 1997.

          208 West 41st Street
          New York, NY 10036

          • The Lehman Trilogy

            The acclaimed play “The Lehman Trilogy,” chronicles the rise and spectacular collapse of what was once one of the country’s largest investment banks. “Behold them with wonder, humble theatergoer, for they are multitudes.” – Ben Brantley

           
          The Nederlander was constructed in 1921 and has been known throughout the years by various names. First it was named the National, then it became the Billy Rose, named in 1959 after the famous producer/songwriter who bought it, and in 1979 it became the Trafalgar when James and Joseph Nederlander and the British firm of Cooney-Marsh bought it.  Today, the David T. Nederlander Theatre stands in honor of the Nederlander Family.  Some of the most famous plays have been housed here including Private Lives, King Lear, Cyrano de Bergerac, Julius Caesar, and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.  One of its most notable productions was Lena Home:  The Lady and Her Music, for which she won a special Tony Award.  It also housed the musical Rent.  For Rent, the theatre’s exterior and interior was decorated to look like a downtown nightclub in order to embrace the atmosphere of the East Village as depicted in the play.

          The Nederlander was constructed in 1921 as the National, and today it stands as the David T. Nederlander Theatre in honor of the Nederlander Family.

          In order to convey the ambiance of the East Village, the theatre was designed to look like a downtown nightclub.

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          239 West 45th Street
          New York, NY 10036

          • Dear Evan Hansen

            The winner of six Tony Awards including Best Musical, Dear Evan Hansen is the deeply personal and profoundly contemporary musical about life and the way we live it. Hailed by critics and audiences alike, Dear Evan Hansen features a book by Tony Award winner Steven Levenson, a score by Academy Award winners Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, and direction by four time Tony Award nominee Michael Greif.

          The Music Box lives up to its name as it was designed with delicate, jewel-like qualities.

          The Music Box Theatre was constructed because of an offer Sam H. Harris, a well-known producer, made to his friend Irving Berlin in 1919.  Harris proposed that if the songwriter would create a musical revue, he would find a venue for it.  Berlin wrote The Music Box Revue and the Music Box was constructed to house the show in 1920.  For each of the next four years, Berlin wrote a completely new version of the show.  Designed by Charles Howard Crane and E. George Kiehler, the theatre has delicate, jewel-like qualities.  It was constructed in the Neo-Georgian style, more in the style of a country home than a standard theatrical style.  In the 1920s, the Shuberts began obtaining shares of the theatre from Harris.  In 1941, Harris died and his wife sold half the shares in the theatre to the Shuberts, and half to Berlin.  Berlin and Shubert obtained equal ownership of the theatre from that point on.  Berlin sold his share of the theatre to the Shuberts in 2007.

          In 1919, Samuel H. Harris, a well-known producer, proposed to his friend Irving Berlin that if the songwriter would write a musical revue, he would find a theatre for it.  In 1920, the Music Box Theatre opened with The Music Box Revue.

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          200 West 45th Street
          New York, NY 10036

          • The Lion King

            With signature direction and conceptualization by Julie Taymor, The Lion King, which was based on the Academy Award winning movie of the same name, premiered on Broadway in 1998, winning six Tonys. This play is a visually rich, musically vibrant telling of the story of Simba—a young lion cub and prince who seems unconcerned with his heritage until his father is murdered. It is then that Simba must learn to survive, grow up and eventually reclaim his thrown.

          The Minskoff Theatre

          To prepare for the opening of Disney’s The Lion King in 2006 over 200 artists worked almost six months to renovate the theatre.

          The Minskoff Theatre opened on March 13, 1973, and was named after one of New York’s well-known real estate families, Sam Minskoff and Sons.  It opened with a revival of the musical Irene starring Debbie Reynolds and Patsy Kelly.  Architect Mariuca Brancoveanu designed a dramatic new setting for the venue.  It begins with a carpet walkway into the theatre, and the main lobby area displays hand-painted, gold-leaf sculpted pictures that decorate the theatre’s massive interior walls.  The Minskoff is one of The Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.  Most recently the venue has housed Saturday Night Fever, Sunset Boulevard, Metro, the long-running revue Black and Blue (winner of three Tonys), The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Scarlet Pimpernel, the revival of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, and Peter Pan with Cathy Rigby.  Over 200 artists worked almost six months to renovate the theatre for Disney’s The Lion King, which opened in 2006 and as of 2012 is still running.

          The Minskoff Theatre opened on March 13, 1973 with a revival of the musical Irene with Debbie Reynolds and Patsy Kelly.

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          200 West 45th Street
          New York, NY 10036

            The Marquis Theatre

            Designed to provide maximum comfort and intimacy for the audience and actors, the Marquis Theatre is located in the Marriot Marquis Hotel.

            The Marquis Theatre, Broadway’s newest legitimate theatre, opened on August 10, 1986, and is located in the Marriot Marquis Hotel.  It was designed to provide maximum comfort for the audience and actors in an intimate setting.  The theatre presents high ceilings, wide aisles, plenty of restrooms and parking, a spacious backstage, up-to-date acoustics, and comfortable seating.  The venue’s opening production was the successful musical Me and My Girl, which ran for 1,420 performances.  Since its opening, the theatre has housed numerous successful musicals including Gypsy (starring Tyne Daly), The Goodbye Girl (starring Bernadette Peters and Martin Short), the long-running Victor/Victoria (with Julie Andrews), Annie Get Your Gun, Man of La Mancha (starring Raul Julia and Sheena Easton), Damn Yankees (with Bebe Neuwirth, Victor Garber, and Jarrod Emick), Peter Pan, and Thoroughly Modern Millie.  The Marquis is one of The Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway houses.

            The Marquis Theatre opened on August 10, 1986, and is Broadway’s newest legitimate theatre.

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            247 West 44th Street
            New York, NY 10036

            • The Phantom of the Opera

              Now it’s YOUR turn to surrender to the magic, the majesty and “The Music of the Night.” For over 25 years, THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA has been the Broadway musical all others are measured against. Broadway’s longest-running musical of all-time. The timeless story, the unforgettable score, the stunning spectacle – all magically combine to bring this unforgettable tragic love story to life each night. And now – whether it’s your first time or tenth time – it’s the BEST ...

            The Majestic TheatreThe Majestic Theatre, a large musical house, was built in 1927 by the Chanin Brothers to supplement two other theatres in a three-theatre facility that included the Royale and the Theatre Masque (now the John Golden).

            The Chanin Brothers constructed the Majestic Theatre in 1927 as part of a three-theatre facility that also included the Royale and the Theatre Masque (now the John Golden).  The Majestic is a large musical house, and it supplemented the other two theatres, allowing producers to move shows based on ticket sales to the most appropriately-sized theatre.  Herbert J. Krapp designed the theatre facility in what he called a “modern Spanish style.”  The Majestic’s exterior above the entrance also features a stylized Palladian theme.  The interior displays the usual Adam-style featured in many Shubert venues.  Krapp formulated a stadium seating model for the theatre’s orchestra (decades before today’s trend for stadium seating in movie theatres).  With its steep rake, the audience’s sight lines are perfect.  He also thought forward in his design and created a single large balcony instead of two smaller ones.  Today, second-balcony seating is less pleasing so producers are hesitant to book these venues.  In 1927, the Majestic’s opening production was a revue entitled Rufus Lemaire’s Affairs.  The Shuberts obtained ownership of all three theatres in 1930.

            Decades before today’s trend for stadium seating in movie theatres, Herbert J. Krapp formulated a stadium seating model for the theatre’s orchestra that provided the audience with perfect sight lines.

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            149 West 45th Street
            New York, NY 10036

            • Sing Street

              Based on the 2016 film by John Carney, filmmaker of “Once,” the musical features a book by Enda Walsh, book writer of the musical “Once,” and a score by Carney and Gary Clark. It is directed by Rebecca Taichman, who returns to Broadway after helming “Indecent” and “Time and the Conways,” and choreographed by Sonya Tayeh (Moulin Rouge!).

            The Lyceum Theatre, Broadway’s oldest consistently operating legitimate theatre, was constructed by David Frohman in 1903.Architects Herts and Tallant designed the Lyceum in a Beaux Arts style.

             

            The Lyceum Theatre was constructed by producer-manager David Frohman in 1903 and is Broadway’s oldest consistently operating legitimate theatre.  Its opening production was The Proud Prince.  The theatre was designed by architects Hert and Tallant in the Beaux Arts style.  When it opened the building presented a high-tech ventilation system, as air was passed over either ice chambers or steam coils on its way into the theatre, the auditorium was maintained cool in the summer and retained heat in the winter.  Frohman built an apartment for himself above the theatre which included a small door that offered a view of the stage below.  There is a legend that Frohman waved a white handkerchief out the door to tell his wife, actress Margaret Illington, that she was overacting.  In 1940 the theatre was obtained by a company of producers which included George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart.  The Shuberts took over in 1950 and have been operating it ever since.  This theatre currently houses the Shubert Archive.

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            205 West 46th Street
            New York, NY 10036

            The Lunt-Fontanne TheatreThe Lunt-Fontanne Theatre opened in 1910 and was originally named The Globe, after Shakespeare’s theatre in England.  The theatre was designed with a retractable roof to allow the theatre to remain open and stay cool during the summer months.  In the early years of this venue, the comedy team of Dave Montgomery and Fred Stone starred in many famous musicals, including The Old Town and Chin-Chin.  The theatre housed various plays and musicals until it was turned into a movie house in 1932.  In 1958, the venue was ransacked and reconstructed as a legitimate theatre.  It was renamed in honor of Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, America’s leading husband/wife acting couple. The couple starred in the newly named theatre’s first production, The Visit.  The Lunt-Fontanne is one of The Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.

            America’s leading husband/wife acting couple, Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, inspired the renaming of the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre.

            220 West 48th Street
            New York, NY 10036

            • Diana

              Diana is the electrifying new musical about a woman who chose to be fearless, and as a result, became timeless. The acclaimed bio-musical arrives on Broadway on March 2, 2020


            Longacre Theatre Seating Chart

             

            The Longacre Theatre was named after the former Longacre Square, now known as Times Square.

            The Longacre Theatre was constructed by producer/manager H.H. Frazee (the owner of the Boston Red Sox who sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees).  He named the theatre after Longacre Square, which is now known as Times Square.  Frazee’s notable productions at the Longacre include Kick In (1914), with John Barrymore and Katherine Harris, A Pair of Sixes (1914), and Nothing but the Truth (1916), with William Collier.  The theatre was designed by Henry B. Herts.  The exterior features a French Neo-classical-style and the interior displays a Beaux Arts-style.  Frazee was struggling financially and eventually had to give up the venue.  In 1919, the theatre fell under the management of Astor Theatre Incorporated, a Shubert affiliate.  From 1943 to 1953, the venue was rented out to WOR as a radio and television studio.  From 2007-2008, architect Michael Kostow had the theatre restored, which was a multimillion dollar project.

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            219 West 48th Street
            New York, NY 10036

            • Hadestown

              A brand new musical with music and lyrics by Anais Mitchell, Hadestown is a brand new adaptation of the classic story of Orpheus in the underworld, where he tries to save Eurydice from Hades.


            In 1921, the Walter Kerr Theatre was built by the Shuberts as the Ritz Theatre

            The Walter Kerr Theatre was designed by Herbert J. Krapp and built by the Shubert family in 1921 as the Ritz Theatre.  Between 1943 and 1965, ABC used the venue as a radio and television studio.  Between 1965 and 1971, the venue remained dormant.  In 1971, the theatre reopened with the musical Soon which closed after three performances.  The Ritz housed numerous productions over the next two years, but then it remained dark from 1973 to 1983.  The last production to be performed at the Ritz was Chu Chem.  After it closed, the Jujamcyn Organization hired EverGreene Architectural Arts to restore the theatre’s interior.  The theatre reopened in 1990 with August Wilson’s The Piano Lesson.  The venue was renamed the Walter Kerr Theatre in honor of the theatre critic.  Since 1990, the Walter Kerr has housed six Tony Award winners for Best Play, including the revolutionary show Angels in America.

             In 1990, the venue reopened in honor of the theatre critic Walter Kerr Theatre with a production of The Piano Lesson by August Wilson.

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            242 West 45th Street
            New York, NY 10036

            • Company

              The quintessential musical comedy about the search for love and cocktails in the Big Apple is turned on its head in Marianne Elliott’s revelatory staging.


            The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre was named after the president of the Shubert Organization in 2005.
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            The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre was constructed in 1927 as the Royale Theatre by the Chanin Brothers.  It was built as part of a three-theatre facility that included the Majestic and the John Golden (formerly known as the Theatre Masque).  This design allowed producers to move shows to the appropriately-sized theatre based on ticket sales.  Herbert J. Krapp designed the theatre with a “modern Spanish style.”  The venue’s opening production was the musical Piggy (a.k.a. I Told You So).  The Shuberts obtained ownership of all three theatres in 1930.  Ownership of the Jacobs transferred to John Golden during the Depression in 1934, and he renamed it after himself.  In 1936, the Shuberts regained ownership, reestablished its name to the Royale, and rented it out to CBS as a radio studio until 1940.  In 2005, it was renamed the Bernard B. Jacobs in honor of the president of the Shubert Organization.

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            249 West 45th Street
            New York, NY 10036


            The Imperial Theatre was the Shubert’s fiftieth New York venue and was constructed to house musical theatre hits.  The theatre was built to replace the Shubert’s 20 year old Lyric Theatre.  The Imperial opened in 1923 with Mary Jane McKane.  Broadway’s biggest money-maker followed in 1924 with the operetta Rose-Marie.  In 1926, Oh, Kay!  opened starring Gertrude Lawrence.  In 1938, Mary Martin made her Broadway debut in Cole Porter’s Leave It to Me in which she sang “My Heart Belongs to Daddy.” She was backed up by chorus boy Gene Kelly.  Other successes of the 1930s include the Gershwin’s Of Thee I Sing and Let ‘Em Eat Cake, Moss Hart’s and Cole Porter’s Jubilee, and Rodgers’ and Hart’s On Your Toes.   The building was designed by Herbert Krapp in his characteristic Adam-style.  The ceiling and wall panels are ornately decorated with numerous themes, such as floral and geometrics.  Krapp designed the auditorium to be wider rather than deeper so the audience would feel closer to the performers.

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            302 West 45th Street
            New York, NY 10036



              The Al Hirschfeld Theatre opened on November 11, 1924 as the Martin Beck Theatre with a production of Madame Pompadour.  The theatre was designed by architect G. Albert Lansburgh for vaudeville advocate Martin Beck.  It was the only theatre in New York owned completely without a mortgage.  The Martin Beck was designed to be the most luxurious theatre of its time.  Celebrities who have performed at the venue include Christina Applegate, David Hyde Pierce, and Daniel Radcliffe.  The theatre holds dressing rooms for 200 actors and has a seating capacity of 1,424 for musicals.  It was renamed the Al Hirschfeld Theatre on June 21, 2003, in honor of the famous caricaturist who drew pictures of Broadway celebrities.  On November 23, 2003, the theatre reopened with a revival of the musical Wonderful Town.  Other productions that have been hosted by the Hirschfeld include The Wedding Singer, A Tale of Two Cities, and Elf.
              On November 11, 1924, the Al Hirschfeld Theatre opened as the Martin Beck Theatre in honor of the vaudeville advocate.hirschfeld2.jpg

              240 West 44th Street
              New York, NY 10036

              • Grand Horizons

                Grand Horizons is a brand new drama by Bess Wohl that follows the happily married life of Nancy and Bill, until one of them wants out.

              • Take Me Out

                Take Me Out is Richard Greenberg’s groundbreaking play and is returning to Broadway!

              The theatre was renamed after the actress Helen Hayes in 1983 when her namesake theatre was destroyed in order to build the New York Marriot Marquis.

              The Helen Hayes Theatre was designed by architect Harry Creighton Ingalls, and built by Winthrop Ames.  It was originally named the Little Theatre because of its small size and dedication to housing intimate productions.  On March 12, 1912, the theatre opened with The Pigeon by John Galsworthy.  Herbert J. Krapp redesigned the theatre in the 1920s to increase its seating capacity and improve its acoustics.  The building was leased to the New York Times in 1931 and adapted into a conference hall.  CBS used the theatre as a radio studio, but ABC adapted it for television in 1958.  The Dick Clark Show started there and was produced on the site from February 1958 through September 1961.  Beginning in 1979, Martin Markinson and Donald Tick ran the theatre.  In 1983, the venue was renamed for actress Helen Hayes (who was still living at the time) when her namesake theatre was destroyed in order to build the New York Marriot Marquis.The theatre was renamed after the actress Helen Hayes in 1983 when her namesake theatre was destroyed in order to build the New York Marriot Marquis.

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              252 West 45th Street
              New York, NY 10036

              • Hangmen

                Martin McDonagh’s award-winning comedy arrives on Broadway.

              In 1927, the John Golden Theatre opened as the Theatre Masque.

              The John Golden Theatre was originally constructed in 1927 as the Theatre Masque by the Chanin Brothers.  It was part of a facility that included the Royale and the Majestic.  The Theatre Masque was the most intimate of the three theatres and was created for serious dramas.  Designed by Herbert J. Krapp, the interior has a Spanish influence.  The venue’s first production, which was Puppets of Passion by Rosso di San Secondo, opened on February 4, 1927 but was not successful.  The Shuberts obtained ownership in 1930.  John Golden took on management in 1937 and renamed it after himself.  In 1946, the Shuberts regained ownership, turning it into a film house for two years.  In the late 1940s, it was renovated to house theatrical performances.  In 2003, it housed another puppet production, the award-winning Avenue Q.  The exterior of the theatre was used as the location of the movie version of A Chorus Line.  It is also featured in the classic Betty Davis film All About Eve.The exterior of the John Golden Theatre can be seen in the movies A Chorus Line and All About Eve.

               

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              222 West 51st Street
              New York, NY 10019

              • Wicked

                Wouldn’t you love to know the Wicked Witch of the West’s backstory? And what about Glinda? How did she come to be so good? Wicked considers both of these questions and more as it reshapes our understanding of what goes down in the Wizard of Oz. This highly imaginative musical features a fine book by Winnie Holzman and music and lyrics by one of Broadway’s most accomplished composers, Stephen Schwartz. Based on the novel by Gregory Maguire, Wicked will fill ...


              The Gershwin Theatre Seating ChartThe Gershwin Theatre opened on November 28, 1972 as the Uris.  It was the first new legitimate theatre built on Broadway since 1928.  Gerald Oestreicher rented it out for 30 years, and the opening production was Via Galactica, a space musical starring Raul Julia.  The show closed after only seven performances.  The venue served as a concert hall from 1974 to 1976. The theatre was renamed the Gershwin on June 5, 1983 in honor of composer George Gershwin and lyricist Ira Gershwin.  The Gershwin is the home of the Theater Hall of Fame.  It has the highest seating capacity of all the Broadway houses—1,831.  The theatre sits on the former site of the Capitol Theatre.  Designed by set designer Ralph Alswang, the venue was constructed in an Art Nouveau style.

              With 1,831 seats, the Gershwin Theatre has the highest seating capacity out of all the Broadway theatres.

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              On November 28, 1972, the Gershwin Theatre opened as the Uris with Via Galactica starring Raul Julia.

              On November 28, 1972, the Gershwin Theatre opened as the Uris with Via Galactica starring Raul Julia.

              With 1,831 seats, the Gershwin Theatre has the highest seating capacity out of all the Broadway theatres.

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              261 West 47th Street
              New York, NY 10036

              • How I Learned To Drive

                Reuniting Mary-Louise Parker and David Morse for the Broadway debut of Paula Vogel’s Pulitzer-winning play.

              On December 7, 1925, the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre opened as the Biltmore.  It was renamed in 2008 in honor of the Broadway publicist, Samuel J. Friedman. On December 7, 1925, the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre opened as the Biltmore. It was renamed in 2008 in honor of the Broadway publicist, Samuel J. Friedman.

              The Samuel J. Friedman Theatre opened on December 7, 1925 as the Biltmore with the play Easy Come Easy Go. Architect Herbert J. Krapp designed it for Irwin Chanin.  Originally, it had 903 seats and was one of Broadway’s smaller houses.  The Federal Theatre’s Living Newspaper project used the venue in the 1930s.  From 1952 until 1961, CBS rented it out as a radio and television studio.  The rock musical Hair opened at the theatre in 1968.  In 1987, a fire destroyed the interior.  The venue sat unused for fourteen years and endured more damage from vandalism and water.  Manhattan Theatre Club obtained the venue in 2001 to house its productions.  The theatre was restored and rebuilt with 650 seats.  On September 4, 2008, the venue was renamed the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre in honor of the Broadway publicist.

              After a fire hit the theatre in 1987 destroying the interior, the Samuel J. Friedman sat unused for fourteen years until it was restored and reconstructed in 2001. After a fire hit the theatre in 1987 destroying the interior, the Samuel J. Friedman sat unused for fourteen years until it was restored and reconstructed in 2001.

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              213 West 42nd Street
              New York, NY 10036

              • Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

                Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series, originally written by J.K. Rowling. In this new Potter-story, Harry is an overworked employee with three kids . His struggles with his youngest son Albus forces them both to confront past and present issues.

              The Foxwoods Theatre Seating Chart

              In 1997, the Ford Center for the Performing Arts (soon to be renamed Foxwoods) opened on the site of the former Apollo and Lyric Theatres.
              In 1997, the Ford Center for the Performing Arts (soon to be renamed Foxwoods) opened on the site of the former Apollo and Lyric Theatres.

              The Lyric Theatre, formerly the Foxwoods Theatre, opened as the Ford Center for the Performing Arts in 1997 on the site of the former Apollo and original Lyric Theatres.  Both of these venues were neglected in the early 1990s.  They were eventually reclaimed by the City and State of New York and fell under the protection of the New 42nd Street organization in 1992.  The theatres were rented out by Livent and destroyed in 1996, although particular major architectural structures were protected and built into the new theatre.  The first production at the new theatre was E.L. Doctorow’s Ragtime on January 26, 1998.  The building was renovated in 2005 and renamed the Hilton Theatre for the U.S. premiere of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.  On January 4, 2009 when Young Frankenstein closed at the theatre, it was unused throughout the rest of the year.  In August 2010, the venue was renamed the Foxwoods Theatre under an agreement with Foxwoods Resort Casino and Live Nation.   In 2014, after the closing of Spider Man: Turn Off the Dark, it was again renamed as The Lyric.

              After Young Frankenstein closed in 2009 the theatre went unused until 2010.

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              138 West 48th Street
              New York, NY 10036

              • The Minutes

                Tracy Letts’ powerful and resonant portrayal of democracy in action.


              The Cort Theatre’s stage arch is comprised of perforated plaster treated with art glass.

              The Cort Theatre is the only existing and functioning legitimate theatre designed by Thomas Lamb.  Lamb’s exterior design was inspired by the 18th century French Petit Trianon at Versailles and his interior design by the architecture from the period of Louis XVI.  The stage’s arch is comprised of perforated plaster treated with art glass, and was designed to be lit during productions.  The arch still remains, but it cannot be lit.  The Cort Theatre was constructed and named for John Cort, general manager of the Northwestern Theatrical Association.  He resigned as a performer with a vaudeville comedy team called Cort and Murphy to work in management in the 1890s.  The first production at the Cort was Peg o’ My Heart starring Laurette Taylor and directed by Oliver Morosco in 1912.  John Cort’s first production at the venue was The Princess Pat, an operetta, in 1915.  In 1927, the Shuberts obtained ownership of the theatre.

              The Cort Theatre’s stage arch is comprised of perforated plaster treated with art glass.

               

              The Cort opened in 1912 with Peg o’ My Heart starring Laurette Taylor.

              The Cort opened in 1912 with Peg o’ My Heart starring Laurette Taylor.

               

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              1633 Broadway
              New York, NY 10019


                The original Circle in the Square was founded in Greenwich Village in 1951, and it did not have a theatre license.

                The original Circle in the Square was founded in Greenwich Village in 1951, and it did not have a theatre license.

                The original Circle in the Square was founded by Paul Libin, Theodore Mann, and Jose Quintero in 1951 and was located in Greenwich Village.  They did not have a theatre license, but Quintero was able to get a cabaret license which meant the production crew and actors could also serve as waiters.  The current theatre was constructed in 1972 and set into the base of the Uris Building, on the former site of the Capitol Theatre. It serves as the home to Circle in the Square Theatre Company.  Their first production on Broadway, a revival of Mourning Becomes Electra, opened on November 15, 1972.    The theatre was designed by Alan Sayles, and it is one of the few Broadway houses to be designed “in the round.”  Although not artistically striking, the lobby and the auditorium are clean and modern, and there are numerous historical photographs of the theatre’s production history decorating the building.  The building also houses Circle in the Square Theatre School.

                 

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                Broadway at 53rd Street
                New York, NY 10019

                • West Side Story

                  West Side Story returns to Broadway under direction of Ivo Van Hove. This wonderful musical by Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, and Arthur Laurents has amazed audiences for decades!


                Broadway Theatre Seating Chart

                The Broadway Theatre opened in 1924 as B.S. Moss’s Colony, a premiere film house.  B.S. Moss hired architect Eugene DeRosa to design the building as part of his movie theatre chain, many of which also housed vaudeville.  Since the theatre was so large, the space was perfect for musical comedies.  The stage was originally built to fit an orchestra to accompany silent films.  The original theatre design was constructed in the Italian Renaissance style, and then it reemerged in polished granite in 1991 when a skyscraper was built above the theatre.  The most noteworthy film that played there was Walt Disney’s Steamboat Willie which opened in 1928.  The theatre began showing theatrical productions from 1930 to 1934, and it was renamed the Broadway.  The theatre was once again dedicated to playing films from 1934 to 1940, and showed the premiere of Disney’s Fantasia in 1939.  It returned to “legitimate” theatre in 1940, and although it briefly became a Cinerama movie theatre in the 1950s, it has remained dedicated to theatrical productions ever since.  The New Yorkers by Cole Porter and Herbert Fields and with Jimmy Durante was the opening production at the Broadway in 1930.

                 

                 

                The New Yorkers,  by Cole Porter and Herbert Fields, was the first theatrical production to be performed at the Broadway in 1930.

                222 West 45th Street
                New York, NY 10036


                  Booth Theatre Seating ChartThe Booth Theatre was built by Lee Shubert and Winthrop Ames for actor Edwin Booth.  The site was the second New York theatre to take on this name.  Ames’s father wanted to continue the actor’s legacy, so the construction of the theatre not only honored Booth, but connected Ames’s family’s interest with the actor.  Ames’s goal was to present the most difficult and respectable productions possible here.  Arnold Bennet’s The Great Adventure opened the Booth on October 16, 1913.  Ames modeled his theatre and productions after contemporary European theatres.   The theatre was designed by Henry Herts to be one part of a pair of playhouses.  The Booth and the Shubert Theatres are adjacent to each other along Shubert Alley.  The Booth is smaller and less ornate than the Shubert.  The graffito on the exterior of both of these theatres is the last known existing example of this once trendy decorating technique.

                   


                  111 West 44th Street
                  New York, NY 10036

                  • Girl From the North Country

                    Girl From the North Country had a critically-acclaimed, smash-hit run at the Public Theater and the West End. This show, with music from Bob Dylan, is bringing its rousing spirit to Broadway.


                  Belasco Seating Chart

                  The Belasco Theatre was opened by David Belasco on October 16, 1907 as the Stuyvesant Theatre.  He had already bestowed his name on his 42nd Street playhouse (currently known as the New Victory), but when he resigned from that theatre in 1910, he renamed the Stuyvesant the Belasco.  Belasco envisioned the auditorium as a living room because he believed that the dramatic experience depended partly on how close the audience was to the actors.  George Keister was hired to design the theatre, and Everett Shinn was hired to create murals and the interior decoration.  To supplement Belasco’s intimate “living room” vision, Keister chose a neo-Georgian style.  The Belasco set the technological standard for theatre design with its freight elevator connecting the stage with its basement shops.  The Belasco’s first production was A Grand Army Man in 1907 with Antoinette Perry.  The Belasco was renovated in 2010.

                   

                  150 West 65th Street
                  New York, NY 10023

                  • Flying Over Sunset

                    A new musical from James Lapine, Tom Kitt and Michael Korie inspired by the lives of three extraordinary people who experimented with LSD.


                  Vivian Beaumont Seating Chart

                  The Vivian Beaumont Theatre opened on October 21, 1965.  It was designed by the famous architect Eero Saarinen and named in honor of Vivian Beaumont Allen, a renowned New York philanthropist.  The Beaumont was originally the home of The Repertory Theater of Lincoln Center, which closed in 1973.  Joseph Papp’s New York Shakespeare Festival was in residence at the Beaumont from 1973 to 1977.  From 1978 to 1985, the Beaumont remained unused when it was not being rented out to outside producers.  A new resident company was created in 1979, but it only staged one season in 1980-1981.  The Beaumont’s current management (Lincoln Center Theatre) was founded in 1985.  The Lincoln Center Theatre has become America’s largest non-profit theatre.  It produces plays and musicals all year at the Beaumont and at numerous other NYC theatres.

                  243 West 47th Street
                  New York, NY 10036

                  • The Inheritance: Part 1

                    The Inheritance-Part 1 is a brand new two-part play by Matthew Lopez that examines what it means to be a gay man in New York.

                  • The Inheritance: Part 2

                    The Inheritance-Part 2 is a brand new two-part play by Matthew Lopez that examines what it means to be a gay man in New York.


                  The Ethel Barrymore Theatre is the last theatre Lee and J.J. Shubert constructed, and it is the only surviving theatre that the Shuberts built for performers who were associated with them.  Designed by Herbert J. Krapp for renowned actress Ethel Barrymore (extremely popular in New York and London), the theatre opened on December 20, 1928.  The outside was fashioned on the design of public baths in Rome.  The interior design combines Elizabethan, Mediterranean, and Adamsesque styles.  Barrymore’s debut at her theatre was in The Kingdom of God in December 1928.  Over the next twelve years she starred in The Love Duel (1929), Scarlett Sister Mary (1930), and The School for Scandal (1931).  Her final performance at her theatre was An International Incident in 1940.  Unlike many of the older theatres that have been used for various purposes, the Barrymore Theatre has consistently housed theatrical productions.


                  In 1940, Ethel Barrymore starred in An International Incident, which was her final performance at the Barrymore Theatre.

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                  256 West 47th Street
                  New York, NY 10036

                  • Six

                    Six The London hit musical nominated for five Olivier Awards including “Best Musical” is headed to Broadway!


                  Originally built as the Mansfield Theatre by the Chanin brothers, the Brooks Atkinson Theatre opened on February 15, 1926.  It was designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp.  It was abandoned after 1933 until Michael Myerberg bought it in 1945 and rented it to CBS for television productions.  Known as CBS Studio 59, the theatre hosted the panel shows I’ve Got a Secret and What’s My Line?  It was renamed in 1960 in honor of the New York Times drama critic Brooks Atkinson and was once again utilized for theatrical productions.  The theatre was redecorated in 2000 by EverGreene Architectural Arts and is once again lit up by the original chandelier that was removed over 40 years ago.  The Brooks Atkinson is one of the Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.  Its capacity is 1,051.

                  The Mansfield Theatre was renamed after theatre reviewer Brooks Atkinson in 1960.

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                  227 West 42nd Street

                  New York, NY  10036

                  • 1776 1776

                    1776 , the Tony award-winning musical comes back to Broadway directed by Diane Paulus!

                  • A Soldier’s Play

                    A hair-raising drama that reverberates with the “authentic and exciting pulse” (Ben Brantley, The New York Times) of mystery, Charles Fuller’s Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece rockets onto Broadway for the first time, starring three-time Tony nominee David Alan Grier and Golden Globe nominee Blair Underwood and directed by Tony Award winner Kenny Leon (A Raisin in the Sun).

                  • Birthday Candles

                    Birthday Candles is a poignant new play by Noah Haidle’s staring Debra Messing making its Broadway debut this spring.

                  aatheatre_trioThe American Airlines Theatre was designed by George Keister and built by the Selwyn brothers, Edgar and Archie, in 1918.  Originally named the Selwyn Theatre, the theatre is a historic Italian Renaissance style Broadway venue.  When built, its most unique feature was separate smoking rooms for men and women.  Also, there was a shower and a telephone in each dressing room.  It was originally used for musicals and other theatrical performances, including Cole Porter’s Wake Up and Dream and Three’s a Crowd with Clifton Webb, but it was eventually used as a movie theatre.  In the early 1990s, it was a visitor’s center and it featured a limited-run production of Eugene O’ Neill’s The Hairy Ape. Then it stood unused for years until the space was renovated in 1997 by The Roundabout Theatre Company.  It was renamed The American Airlines Theatre in honor of its major sponsor, and reopened on June 30, 2000.  The theatre originally had 1,180 seats, and now has only 740 seats.  It currently serves as the home of the Roundabout.

                   
                   


                   
                   

                   

                   

                  219 West 49th Street

                  New York, NY 10019

                   

                  • Chicago

                    If there’s ever a show that always seems to be ripe for a revival, it’s the musical Chicago. And why wouldn’t it be immensely popular? Along with offering audiences strikingly theatrical music and lyrics, the emotional rollercoaster, Chicago is dark, satirical and at times amazingly cold-hearted. Then again, the story of a married woman who murders her lover in order to help her career would have to have all of these elements, and more. Chicago is one of the finest shows ever written for the legitimate stage.

                  ambassador01The Ambassador Theatre was designed for the Shuberts by architect Herbert J. Krapp and opened on February 11, 1921, with the musical The Rose Girl.  To fit the maximum number of seats possible, the theatre is positioned diagonally on its site.  As a result, stage-wing space is minimal.  In 1935, the Shuberts sold the theatre, and it was converted into a movie theatre, serving in that capacity for the next twenty years.  NBC and the DuMont Television Network then utilized the space as a television studio.ambassador02  In 1956, the Shuberts regained ownership and since that time the theatre has only housed theatrical productions.  Despite its simple external appearance, the layout inside is uniquely hexagonal.  Krapp designed the interior more ornately, using Adam-style plasterwork which was one of his favorite design themes.  It’s capacity is 1,088.

                   


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